Dog Vaccines

For all dogs:

 

Distemper combination vaccination

 

All dogs should be vaccinated for distemper, parvovirus, hepatitis, leptospirosis, and parainfluenza. These are sometimes combined into one vaccine. At the Bancroft Veterinary Clinic we use a vaccine containing a low passage/high titer Parvo portion which gives the best immunity to this deadly disease. Regardless of age, your dog should have an initial series of three vaccines at three week intervals followed by a booster vaccination in one year and then periodic booster vaccinations.

 

Rabies vaccination

 

All dogs should be vaccinated for Rabies.  Current Rabies vaccination by a licensed veterinarian is required for county dog licensing.

 

Your dog must be 12 weeks or older to be vaccinated for Rabies. The first Rabies vaccination provides protection for 1 year.  After the first vaccine, subsequent Rabies vaccinations will last for three years as long as the booster is given by its due date.

 

 

Depending on your dog’s lifestyle:

Bordetella (Kennel Cough) vaccination

 

Bordetella vaccination is recommended for dogs that will be kenneled or in other situations where they may be exposed to many other dogs (grooming facilities, show dogs, etc.)

 

Bordetella vaccine is available in both an injectable and an intranasal drop form.  The doctor will determine which is appropriate for you dog.  This vaccine requires yearly boosters.

 

 

Lyme Disease vaccination

 

Lyme disease vaccination is recommended for dogs that may have exposure to deer ticks (hunting dogs or dogs that spend a lot of time in the woods), or for dogs that will be traveling in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula or Wisconsin.

 

Dogs can be vaccinated starting at twelve weeks of age.  Initial vaccination requires a series of two vaccines two to four week apart followed by annual booster vaccination.

Cat Vaccines

For all cats:

 

Distemper (Panleukopenia), Rhinotracheitis, Calici combination vaccination

 

All cats should be vaccinated for Feline Distemper, Rhinotracheitis and Calici virus.

If your cat is under nine weeks of age it should have a series of three vaccines at three week intervals, a booster vaccination in a year, and then periodic booster vaccinations.

If your cat is nine weeks of age or older it should have a series of two vaccines at three week intervals to start its vaccinations.

 

Rabies vaccination

 

All cats should be vaccinated for Rabies because it is contagious to humans.

Your cat must be 12 weeks or older to be receive a Rabies vaccination.

The first Rabies vaccination provides protection for one year.  After the first vaccine, subsequent Rabies vaccinations will last for three years as long as the booster is given by its due date.

 

For cats with exposure to other cats:

 

Leukemia vaccination

 

Leukemia vaccination is recommended for cats which go outside or are in multi-cat households.

Your cat must be nine weeks or older to be vaccinated for Leukemia and should have a series of two vaccines at three week intervals, then a booster vaccination every year. 

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SERVICES

- Vaccinations

- Wellness Visits
- Surgical procedures

- Radiographs

- Ultrasound

- Microchipping

-Therapeutic laser

-Surgical laser

-Dental Cleaning and       Radiographs


 

HOURS

8:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Monday -Tuesday-Wednesday-Friday

 

8:30 AM - 6:00 PM

Thursday

 

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Every other Saturday

ADDRESS

5321 E. Lansing Rd.

Bancroft, MI 48414

 

E-mail: bancroftvet@hotmail.com
Tel:       989-634-5402

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